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Saturday: Public Forum on Delaware Prisons

INSIDE: Right and Wrong in Delaware Prisons

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This timely discussion will focus on whether Delaware’s corrections system is serving the needs of the community. Is it providing rehabilitation, training, and treatment—or retributive punishment, ongoing state violence, and a revolving door of recidivism? Our panelists will include:

Coley Harris, Restorative Justice Activist and Returned Citizen
John Flynn, New Beginnings/Next Steps
Rep. J.J. Johnson, Chair of the Delaware House Corrections Committee
Kathleen Macrae, Executive Director of ACLU Delaware

The free event begins at 9:00 a.m. on Saturday, March 4, at the Episcopal Church of Sts. Andrew and Matthew, 701 N. Shipley St., Wilmington. 

Help us publicize this event:
Download our printable poster (pdf)
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Like us on Facebook.

Additional images and graphic resources are avaialble on our Resources Page.

This Saturday: Public Forum — Alternatives to Violence

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Conflict is part of daily life … but violence doesn’t have to be.

We live in a violent society and violence comes in many forms—physical and intangible. Although the violence we encounter in our everyday life is often verbal and emotional, many are shocked by the increasing conflict on the streets, in our schools, and in the home.

People in the United States have twice the chance of being murdered than in many other Western countries. Violence knows no class, no racial, economic, or geographical boundaries. Our schools have resorted to metal detectors. Violence in the home—physical and mental—directed against both spouse and child.

We lead the world in prison population, and our prisons, viewed as a way of protecting society from violence, spawn more violence. Over ninety percent of prisoners eventually return to society from a prison experience that encourages violence.

Movement for a Culture of Peace

invites you to learn more about

Delaware’s Alternatives to Violence Program

AVP is an evidence-based experiential program that helps people change their lives. Proven in prisons, AVP now offers this new approach to community groups, businesses, social service agencies, educators, and youth organizations.

 Saturday, Feb. 4

9:00 to 11:00 a.m.

Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew and Matthew

719 North Shipley St. Wilmington 19801 

Panelists

Sr. Mary Killoran OSF, Coordinator of AVP prison workshops in Howard Young Correctional Center (Wilmington DE)

Rachel VerNooy, Coordinator of AVP community workshops in New Castle County DE

Kathleen Higgins, Facilitator of AVP prison workshops in Howard Young Correctional (Wilmington DE)

 

Please help us publicize this timely event. Printable posters and graphics for social media are available for download on our Resources Page.

 

50 Years of Peace Work

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Congratulations to Pacem in Terris for 50 years of working for peace and justice. Movement for a Culture of Peace is only the latest of this distinguished organization’s initiatives. MCP is proud to be associatesd with Pacem in Terris.

Learn more in this op-ed by Judith Butler, board chair, and Medard Gabel, executive director.

 

Wilmington Peacekeepers Video

Wilmington Peacekeepers were founding partners of the Movement for a Culture of Peace.

Enjoy this video about their work by Brother Caleeb Watson.

 


<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/200753510″>It's all about LOVE! &quot;Wilmington Peacekeepers Assoc.&quot;</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/caleebawatson”>CALEEB A WATSON</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>
<p>The Wilmington Peacekeepers Association is a multi-denominational, God-centered, ethnically diverse group of mostly men, and women, who have come together in an earnest effort to reclaim individuals and society from the brink of Catastrophe. First and foremost, The Peacekeepers are out to set things right with God, society and relationships. We are especially concerned with gun violence and the educational development of our young people.</p>

This Saturday: Public Forum — Alternatives to Violence

2017-02-04_avp_poster_square_300

Conflict is part of daily life … but violence doesn’t have to be.

We live in a violent society and violence comes in many forms—physical and intangible. Although the violence we encounter in our everyday life is often verbal and emotional, many are shocked by the increasing conflict on the streets, in our schools, and in the home.

People in the United States have twice the chance of being murdered than in many other Western countries. Violence knows no class, no racial, economic, or geographical boundaries. Our schools have resorted to metal detectors. Violence in the home—physical and mental—directed against both spouse and child.

We lead the world in prison population, and our prisons, viewed as a way of protecting society from violence, spawn more violence. Over ninety percent of prisoners eventually return to society from a prison experience that encourages violence.

Movement for a Culture of Peace
invites you to learn more about

Delaware’s Alternatives to Violence Program

AVP is an evidence-based experiential program that helps people change their lives. Proven in prisons, AVP now offers this new approach to community groups, businesses, social service agencies, educators, and youth organizations.

 Saturday, Feb. 4
9:00 to 11:00 a.m.

Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew and Matthew
719 North Shipley St. Wilmington 19801 

Panelists

Sr. Mary Killoran OSF, Coordinator of AVP prison workshops in Howard Young Correctional Center (Wilmington DE)

Rachel VerNooy, Coordinator of AVP community workshops in New Castle County DE

Kathleen Higgins, Facilitator of AVP prison workshops in Howard Young Correctional (Wilmington DE)

 

Please help us publicize this timely event. Printable posters and graphics for social media are available for download on our Resources Page.

 

March for Peace and Justice on Martin Luther King Day

Join the Movement for a Culture of Peace, West Side Grows, and other community partners for this event on Monday, Jan. 16. The march will be led by Wilmington Peaceleepers, founding partners of Culture of Peace.

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December 3 Public Forum

Information and Intervention

Putting the CDC Report into Action

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MOVEMENT FOR A CULTURE OF PEACE
Saturday, Dec. 3 – 9 to 11 a.m.
St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church
1301 N. Broom St., Wilmington 19806

2016-12-03_cdc_poster_sm-square_300The Movement for a Culture of Peace (MCP) forum on Saturday, Dec. 3 will focus on implementation of the 2015 report on patterns of violence in Wilmington by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

If you attended MCP’s January 2016 meeting, you learned about this report from DHSS Secretary Rita Landgraf. The CDC recommended formation of a state advisory group to develop highly integrated, coordinated, and individualized services for young people who are identified as being most at risk for becoming perpetrators or vistims of violence.

At the Dec. 3 MCP forum, Secretary Landgraf will review the report’s findings and the work of the Community Advisory Group that she appointed in March.

Landgraf will be joined by Hanifa Shabazz, newly elected Wilmington City Council President, who made the initial request for the CDC study, and two members of the Advisory Group: Dr. Sandra Medinilla, medical director for violence prevention at Christiana Care Health System, and Dorrell Green, assistant superintendent of the Brandywine School District.

Following brief presentations by the panelists about the CDC findings and the work of the Advisory Group, our guests will take questions from the audience.

The CDC report, released in November 2015, looks at gun violence from a public health and social services perspective, not from a law enforcement perspective. The report recommended that Delaware develop the capacity to link and share data between state organizations, connecting data systems to identify potential candidates for intervention services, and provide highly integrated, coordinated, and customized services for high-risk populations.

 

DOWNLOAD AND PRINT FULL POSTER (PDF)2016-12-03_cdc_poster

OTHER GRAPHICS ON OUR RESOURCE PAGE

CARTOON ©2016 DAN WASSERMAN. USED WITH PERMISSION OF THE ARTIST. 

Organizers and Supporters

Become a Supporter of the 2015 March for a Culture of Peace.
Register your organization today at the Register Your Organization page.
Organizations and sponsors will be listed here as they register.

PRINCIPAL ORGANIZERS

• Delaware Coalition Against Gun Violence
• First Unitarian Church Social Justice Forum
• Heeding God's Call to End Gun Violence
• One Village Alliance
• Pacem in Terris
• Wilmington Peacekeepers

2015 SPONSORS

• Ainsley's Pharmacy
• Sating Francis Healthcare

2015 PARTNERS
• Delaware Citizens Opposed to the Death Penalty
•The Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew and Matthew
•Metropolitan Wilmington Urban League Young Professionals
• Edgemoor Revitalization Cooperative, Inc.
• St. Helena's Parish Social Ministry
• Brandon Lee Brinkley Foundation
• Delaware Alliance for Community Advancement
• Newark Friends Meeting
• Silverside Church
• Delaware Center for Justice
• ACLU of Delaware
• North Brandywine Civic Association
• Because U Matter Community Outreach
• Congregation Beth Emeth
• Unitarian Universalists of Southern Delaware
• Warriors4Christ
• Safe United Neighborhoods S.U.N.
• Quaker Hill Neighborhood Association
• West Side Grows Together
• Hopes Academy
• St. David's Episcopal Church
• Trinity Parish
• City Church of Wilmington
• Missio Grace
• Stop the Violence Prayer Chain Foundation
• St. Francis Healthcare
• Hanover Presbyterian Church
• Trinity Episcopal Church
• Latin Community Center / El Centro Latino
• The Awakened Kitchen
• M.O.T.H.E.R.S Inc.
• Center for Joyful Living
• Urban Promise
• YWCA Delaware
• Churches Take a Corner (CTAC)
• Salesianum School Center for Faith and Justice
• Murder Victims for Reconciliation
• Girls Inc of Delaware
• National Assoc. of Black Veterans, Chap. 94